Good Practice Database - Country - SE - Tinnerö municipality Nature Reserve
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Tinnerö municipality Nature Reserve

Practice on:

Nature reserve and grazing entrepreneur

Practical details:
NUTS 1: SE1Östra Sverige
NUTS 2: SE12 Östra Mellansverige
Start date: 2006
Type of initiative:  public
Description of the practice:

Tinnerö Nature Reserve is a part of the unique Östergötland oak district that offers both a cultural and biological interesting landscape. The grazing entrepreneur CGs Naturvård AB are contracted to preserve and develop the high natural and cultural values.


Preserving and safeguarding of biological diversity and cultural heritage as well as biological production and grazing landscapes is connected to the national environmental quality objectives in Sweden. (http://www.miljomal.nu/Environmental-Objectives-Portal/)

Tinnerö Nature Reserve is a part of the unique Östergötland oak district. It is a more than 600 hectares large Nature Reserve that was established when the military didn´t need the area any longer for military training. The reserve was established 2006 after discussions how to use this valuable area in the very surroundings of Linköping City. The area is owned and managed by Linköpings municipality.
Unrivalled numbers of old stately oaks can be found here in undulating pasturelands, along with an abundance of plants and animals that inhabit the area. Man has formed this oak landscape over a long period of time. The oldest trace of mans existence here is a fireplace dating back to 5800 BC. Much of the area’s rich treasure of ancient remains are from the Roman Iron Age (0–400 AD) and tell of a period of great prosperity and expansion. Examples from this period are ancient arable land, remains of fences and grave fields. An interesting remnant from the end of the Iron Age is a 200 m long paved bridge construction found northeast of the farm Tinnerö gård. During the 1900s the area was used as a military training ground, which has preserved the landscape and allowed the oaks to remain standing.
Since Linköping Municipality took over Tinnerö in 2002 large restoration projects have been carried out at enhancing all the different species in the area and the cultural landscape as a whole. Overgrown land has been cleared and grazing reintroduced. To the south is the reclaimed lake Rosenkällasjön with its rich bird life. The area offers good access to visitors with marked trails, picnic areas and parking areas with information boards. A rich programme of guiding is carried through every year, in co-operation with many NGOs, attracting many visitors. Some examples of guide activities are bat safari, letting the cows out after the winter, walks to show the biological cultural heritage, old time music in the sunset, late night summer bird watching, etc.
The grazing animals are crucial to preserve and develop the high natural and cultural values in the oak landscape in Tinnerö. CGs Naturvård AB is the grazing entrepreneur that are contracted to do the grazing at Tinnerö. The newly built cow house is important in this work. CGs Naturvård AB also do other nature conservation work at Tinnerö as fencing, constructing passages through, and over, fences, constructing wooden bridges in wet areas, etc. The entrepreneurs behind CGs Naturvård AB are contracted by the municipality of Linköping, being seen as most suitable in preserving nature rather than aiming to be lowest in price.

Evidence of success
Biological/biodiversity values:

Tinnerö Nature Reserve has a great number of old stately oaks in undulating pasturelands and abundance of plants and animals that inhabit the area. More than 160 red listed spices have been found in the reserve and lake Rosenkällasjön has a rich birdlife.

Visual impact and recreational value:

Tinnerö Nature Reserve’s ancient remains mixed with old oaks and pasture land offers an excellent view. The landscape is a varied patchwork consisting mainly of oak but also marshlands, conifers and deciduous forests. The different areas are connected by gravel roads and are easily accessible by foot or bicycle and several towers have been built around Lake Rosensjön for birdwatching.

Cultural heritage:

Man has formed this oak landscape over a long period of time. The oldest trace of mans existence here is a fireplace dating back to 5800 BC. Much of the area’s rich treasure of ancient remains are from the Roman Iron Age (0–400 AD) and tell of a period of great prosperity and expansion.

Environmental impact:

Low impact. The danger of losing the biodiversity is avoided by making the area into an nature reserve and with help from the grazing entrepreneurs.

Transferability:
Yes. To restore nature in the reserve and to contract grazing entrepreneurs to preserve the nature is transferable to other regions in Europe.

Contact details:
Name:
Organisation:
Website: http://www.linkoping.se/Miljo-halsa/Natur/Naturreservat/Tinnero/


Completed on:
Date added: 17.7.2012  Hits: 114
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